The world you’re looking for is beautiful, 2017

I don’t have children. When it comes to family, I tend to look at the past, not the future. Nostalgia haunts my vision of the present.
This series is a visual attempt to fuse together opposing, intensely personal worlds.
In the foreground, film slides from my father’s photo archive depicts everyday scenes from our distant family history. A boy from the seventies’ achingly simpler, happier, decisively analogue world, faded by time. The background consists of pixelised photographs I myself have taken, more than thirty years later, in all of the places I have recently called home. These suggest a complex, harsher state of marginalised being, all the more splintered in the face of an advancing digital technocracy.
I was curious to see the effect of literally superimposing one reality over another. The concrete past and the distant present. Where words fail, and memory stirs, as if raised from an eternal child’s grainy slumber.
In the end, only a fractured image remains.